Please pick only 1 post size and/or column!!
CHOOSE YOUR COMBO!
1 column - 500px posts / 400px posts / 250px posts
2 columns - 250px posts only
- 3 minutes ago

nargyle:

Been nailing down Crazy Flush’s world building specifics lately. Some important world and plot info for the ‘verse! : The sun in their world is an ancient giant flaming Phoenix that’s been flying around the Earth since the dawn of time, bringing daylight in its wake. Without this bird deity, life on Earth as we know it would cease to exist and more importantly, there would be no story nor plot conflict to the comic itself.

- 4 minutes ago

wolvensnothere:

thepurposeofplaying:

alljustletters:

narcomanic:

narcomanic:

i’m pretty sure this twitter account is how sexting works in night vale

i mean really

image

image

image

image

what is going on here

this is officially my new favourite thing

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

thank you for sharing it with us

image

SEXTS FROM THE VOID

- 5 minutes ago
the-dave-strider whispered: Hey Tmirai! You seem like a good person to ask about art/reference stuff. I've always had trouble drawing symmetrical eyes in my art, but lately it's become a huge hassle to the point like I feel like it's holding me back. Do you have any links to any good eye tutorials or websites where I can get a lot of practice in, or just general words of wisdom?

tmirai:

Hrm, well, I’ll share with you my favorite eye reference, which is by sakimichan. It’s a reference specifically for stylized eyes, but it is a helpful reminder that eyes have different shapes and there are various parts of the eye that can be exaggerated or varied to give them more character. I also use this very handy 3D viewer of a head on Posemaniacs that you can re-angle and turn around (third choice on the right). It’s great for figuring out how to draw eyes (or other facial features) from various angles.

Eyes are very nearly symmetrical, with both sharing about the same size and shape. Yet they aren’t precisely mirrored. There are some faint differences between eyes. If you’ve ever drawn an eye, then copied and pasted said eye, and flipped it in order to make the opposite one exactly the same, chances are it comes across looking rather cross-eyed, unnatural, and awkward, like so:

Instead, it’s easiest to approach drawings eyes with a very basic shape. Eyeballs themselves are round, but the shape of eyes is usually kind of oval or almond-shaped. Let’s get even simpler and think of eyes as a narrow diamond with four points.

A rule of thumb I learned in Drawing 101 was that the width between the eyes is about equivalent to the width of one eye. This varies, of course, from face to face, but it’s a good place to start. I use the colored dots and red lines as guidelines to draw my eyes. It helps me replicate the same dimensions and features of one eye for the other. I pay attention to how the eye falls within my guidelines (for instance, how close the top of the eyelids should come to the top blue dot). What I do for one eye, I do for the other.

See how much more aesthetically pleasing that looks compared to the first example? The eyes may not be perfectly symmetrical (and I definitely could have drawn them better), but they still look cohesive. If anything, it’s the slight differences in them that give them some life!

You can use the diamond guide to draw all sorts of eyes, and from different angles as well. When drawing the head turning from left to right, the diamonds will be compress vertically. Think of the yellow dots getting closer together. Whatever eye is closest to the edge of the face (the viewer’s left and right respectively in the two bottom examples) will be more compressed than the other because of the angle. Note that your guide dots will always remain aligned with one another: the yellow dots (corners of the eyes) will be aligned on the blue line that bisects the skull, while the blue dots (the upper and lower lids) will also be aligned with one another as shown by the green lines.

When the head tilts up and down, the eyes compress horizontally instead, with the blue dots drawing closer together. When the head tilts up, the blue dots shift upward, and when it tilts down, the blue dots shift down. Also note that the yellow dots don’t align as perfectly as they do in the above examples, but still remain on that bisecting blue line which has rotated and become curved.

I hope this helps! Remember, these are just guidelines to help and shouldn’t constrict you in regard to what shape or size eyes you draw!

wannabeanimator:

On July 29th, 1989, Hayao Miyazaki’s Kiki’s Delivery Service was released in theatres in Japan. The story takes place in a fictional Europe where WWI and WWII didn’t happen.

joskue:

joskue:

spot the difference

- 13 minutes ago

primaniallerina:

wackcalzone:

my type

  • that guy in the state farm commercial that says “can i get a hot tub” like hes prayin in a church

image

- 15 minutes ago

Zankyou no Terror | Episode 3Search & Destroy

- 25 minutes ago

x

- 35 minutes ago

godzuki:

I’ve been really stressed out lately

- 36 minutes ago